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Can Drinking 4 Glasses of Water a Day Double Language Learning?

Amazing New Study Reveals Secret to Faster Language Learning

Drinking Water Doubles Language Learning

Photo © Gmaxwell

Researchers have long considered language learning to be a combination of the right method and a motivated student, but one researcher may have discovered the hidden key to unlocking second language proficiency.

In a surprising new study, scientists found that students who drink four or more glasses of water a day are able to double their language learning ability!

Learning a new language isn’t always easy.  While our brains might be capable of amazing feats of dexterity, they can also seize up at the most inopportune moments.  But what if, with just a few small changes to our daily habits, we could increase, or even double our ability to acquire new words and phrases?

According to Dr. Noah Comprenday, that kind of learning could be within reach for almost everyone.  Comprenday, a professor of neurolinguisticpharmacology at the Marlborough Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) has devoted his career to the study of language acquisition.  While his findings are nothing short of amazing, much of his work explodes common misunderstandings and myths about what it takes to learn a language.

In one of his earlier studies, a set of volunteers were asked to eat a large quantity of chili peppers while listening to music in the target language.  Their initial burst of fluency was followed by several days of scatological jokes in their native language, and subsequent testing revealed no increase in overall proficiency.

In another study that showed initial promise, volunteers were asked to keep a written journal describing attempts at getting 6-year-olds to try several new foods, using the target language.  Volunteers quit this study after just 30 minutes.

Finally, Dr. Comprenday asked a group of his graduate students to try drinking various amounts of wine and beer, while using a Pimsleur course.  The control group was assigned to drink water.  As expected, the wine and beer drinkers showed some initial promise, but unfortunately, they were unable to complete the language assessment at the end.   Meanwhile, those in the control group were found to have doubled the rate of new language they were able to acquire.

No single strategy will work for everyone,” says Dr. Comprenday, “But everyone can find a strategy that works.”